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McCrory addresses problems on first Monday as governor

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RALEIGH - Gov. Pat McCrory wasted no time getting down to work as the state's chief executive.

McCrory took his oath of office Saturday, and less than 48 hours later he has signed his first executive order.

It rescinds an executive order signed by former Gov. Bev Perdue, which created a judicial nominating commission. She ran into problems with the commission not working quickly enough at the end of her term and he said he doesn't need it.

“My bigger concern is having an executive order that doesn't work,” says McCrory, “and we saw that it doesn't work. So I am going to make corrections.”

McCrory also met with his cabinet on his first Monday morning in office. There he was met with a list of concerns about state agencies and government operations.

“The IT systems are broken in almost every department that I have talked to my secretaries," he said.

McCrory points to an audit just completed by the State Auditor's Office that consolidation goals in the Office of Information Technolgy is not showing positive results and that new systems are set to be in place this summer.

McCrory said he is not sure the systems are ready to go.

“If this new system is not implemented in the way that it was initially designed,” said McCrory, “then we are going to have some major issues in July with our citizens getting services from state government.”

He also expressed concerns about maintenance of state buildings. He said he had to go no further than across the street from the governor's mansion to find state buildings in disrepair.

“We are getting feedback from employees that they would rather be in leased buildings because they know it is better taken care of than buildings owned by state government. That's not a good sign," he said.

McCrory noted that budget wise the state is expected to have the slimmest of surpluses at year's end. so finding the money to fix problems is not going to be easy.

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